Phonar collaborators Pete Brook and Stephen Mayes in conversation for Wired.

Hopefully some of the themes in Pete’s article will sound familiar to us over here on #phonar. This is one not to be missed and brought to you by the ex-Director of VII Agency no less

Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences

[Stephen Mayes] argues that the rise of digital changed the very nature of photography by moving it from a fixed image to a fluid one. The swift pace at which we create images is only matched by the pace at which we discard them and yet, paradoxically, we’ve never been more engaged with images. Photography is less about document or evidence and more about community and experience … and that’s not a bad thing.

“The way we relate to imagery is changing,” says Mayes, who thinks the pace of change is astonishing. Fortune magazine reported in September 2012 that “10% of all photos ever taken were shot in 2011.” That same month, Mark Zuckerberg said Instagram, just shy of two-years in existence, passed the 100 million users. Instagram users, who are signing up a rate of one per second, have taken over one billion images with the app. Such frenzied activity will account for some but not . . . → Read More: Phonar collaborators Pete Brook and Stephen Mayes in conversation for Wired.

Guest Lecture: Benjamin Chesterton

This lecture by documentary producer and prominent blogger Benjamin Chesterton of ‘Duckrabbit Productions’ was from 2011 but well worth a re-visit. A great deal of what he had to say is relevant to our class especially when he talks about the power audio can bring to an image, as well as issues of misinterpretation, responsibility and bias. All key subject for #phonar students

Quoted from the original session..

We were honoured to have Benjamin Chesterton join us today for a lecture, Q+A and an ‘Off The Record’ session with students. The audio from the talk is available to listen to below, as well as a link to the Robert Gumpert image and audio discussed in the first part of the lecture and embedded belowis ‘Open Eye: Lebanon’s Missing’ – the documentary Benjamin produced, working with photographer Dalia Khamissy to tell the story of the thousands of people kidnapped during the Lebanese civil war.

Listen to the lecture below Q+A at 32:25

. . . → Read More: Guest Lecture: Benjamin Chesterton

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Phonar - [fo-'när] is a free and open undergraduate photography class run by Jonathan Worth


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